News from the Garden

Our native plant garden is in bloom!
Two years ago, we were fortunate to have Meredeth Dash from the Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay, Bill Shanabruch from Reedy Creek Environmental, and parent and master naturalist Laura Greenleaf join us to engage our students in a conservation landscaping project. Students planted and learned about the importance of locally native plants which are vital to the health of our environment and watershed. We now have a beautiful, flourishing native garden to enjoy year after year. Laura Greenleaf has spent many hours over the last two years maintaining this garden, and she recently took some photos of plants currently in bloom. See her photos and learn fun facts about each plant below. Thank you so much for your time and effort, Laura!
Find out more about the Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay as well as “bayscaping” here:
flower photo
Golden Alexander  Zizia aurea
Larval host plant to Black Swallowtail butterfly
flower photo
Fringe Tree  Chionthus virginicus
(Front of school)
flower photo
Green and Gold  Chrysoganum virginianum
Tolerant ground cover; member of aster family
flower photo
Serviceberry Downy or Canada  Amelanchier arborea  or  canadensis
(Front of school)
flower photo
Virginia Sweetspire  Itea virginica
Nectar is an insect magnet; look for its vibrant color in fall
flower photo
Woodland Phlox  Phlox divaricate
Associated with many feeding insects including butterfly and moth species
flower photo
Alumroot (or Coral Bells)  Heuchera Americana
Drought tolerant, friend of small bees
flower photo
Arrow-wood  Viburnum dentatum
Called Arrow-wood for, perhaps, obvious reason association with native American Indians . . .
All Viburnums are “wildlife powerhouses” – flowers feed native bees and other pollinators; later berries feed songbirds.
flower photo
Bluestar Flower  Amsonia taberaemontana
Truly at home in Richmond; it occurs infrequently in its limited range.

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